Emotions resources
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  1. #1
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    Default Emotions resources

    What sort of emotions resources do you have and how do you use them? I have a couple of books and a puzzle. My LA advisor suggested dolls or puppets. I have had a look online but this sort of thing seems to be expensive!

    We talk about our emotions all the time e.g. when we're tired, if we are sad because we miss Mummy.

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    I use puppets/cuddly toys all the time, but they are just our everyday toys, not ones that I bought especially - they don't need to be. I act out little scenarios with them as and when needed - for example, one puppet it not sharing any of the colouring pencils - I get the children to observe what is happening, talk about the feelings of those involved and come up with possible solutions. I have used them to discuss anything from not tidying up, name calling, home sickness, loneliness, leaving a child out of a game, showing off etc. The children love it. It's a great way of introducing new 'feelings words' - you can bet your life that each time you say "Oh dear, so how do you think Bunny is feeling now?" they will all say "saaaad", so it's a great way to improve their emotional literacy. Then obviously you need to help the children to recognise and name these feelings in themselves in real life contexts.

    I have some lovely books too. If you go on Amazon and just type in stories about emotions and loads will come up. I usually read the blurb/reviews and order them from my local library. If I think they are worth becoming a permanent resource then I will buy it after reading it first.

    I got a beautiful book full of postcards from Oxfam years ago. Each one is just an image of a person/people from around the world in a positive context in everyday life. Some of them have a huge smile on their face, or are rocking a little one who looks sleepy, have a determined look on their faces, look proud etc etc. It's a fabulous resource in general for Understanding the World. I think they still do similar things in Oxfam. I also have a collection of photos of real children that I have collected from various sources showing some negative emotions too.

    Sometimes we play games like 'Simon Says show me a happy/angry/scared/sad/excited/surprised face' or "Who can describe how Teddy is feeling today by listening to 'how' he says his words?" The teddy can then say "Good afternoon children" in a tired/scared etc voice.

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    https://www.amazon.co.uk/Lucys-Quarr.../dp/1845078969

    Not sure if that link works, but this is one of my favourites.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Maza View Post
    https://www.amazon.co.uk/Lucys-Quarr.../dp/1845078969

    Not sure if that link works, but this is one of my favourites.
    Wow! I've finally learnt how to do a link!!! I'm feeling happy, proud and shocked right now!

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    Quote Originally Posted by Maza View Post
    Wow! I've finally learnt how to do a link!!! I'm feeling happy, proud and shocked right now!

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    Quote Originally Posted by Maza View Post
    I use puppets/cuddly toys all the time, but they are just our everyday toys, not ones that I bought especially - they don't need to be. I act out little scenarios with them as and when needed - for example, one puppet it not sharing any of the colouring pencils - I get the children to observe what is happening, talk about the feelings of those involved and come up with possible solutions. I have used them to discuss anything from not tidying up, name calling, home sickness, loneliness, leaving a child out of a game, showing off etc. The children love it. It's a great way of introducing new 'feelings words' - you can bet your life that each time you say "Oh dear, so how do you think Bunny is feeling now?" they will all say "saaaad", so it's a great way to improve their emotional literacy. Then obviously you need to help the children to recognise and name these feelings in themselves in real life contexts.

    I have some lovely books too. If you go on Amazon and just type in stories about emotions and loads will come up. I usually read the blurb/reviews and order them from my local library. If I think they are worth becoming a permanent resource then I will buy it after reading it first.

    I got a beautiful book full of postcards from Oxfam years ago. Each one is just an image of a person/people from around the world in a positive context in everyday life. Some of them have a huge smile on their face, or are rocking a little one who looks sleepy, have a determined look on their faces, look proud etc etc. It's a fabulous resource in general for Understanding the World. I think they still do similar things in Oxfam. I also have a collection of photos of real children that I have collected from various sources showing some negative emotions too.

    Sometimes we play games like 'Simon Says show me a happy/angry/scared/sad/excited/surprised face' or "Who can describe how Teddy is feeling today by listening to 'how' he says his words?" The teddy can then say "Good afternoon children" in a tired/scared etc voice.
    Thanks Maza. Great ideas. It's obvious when you say that I can use cuddly toys, etc. In fact I just used a baby doll with one of my LOs to show being gentle and what we can do if a baby is upset. I love new books - I have a long Amazon wishlist! I will check out Oxfam too.

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    Make paper plate masks showing different faces and put each on in turn, whilst asking "what am I feeling?"

    You can cut out lots of difference face pictures then match them to flash cards with words that match the emotions.

    Or simply ask "how do you think they feel?" at pertinent points in a story.

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    We have 2 dolls called Rosie and Tom - they watch rather than play - we use them for all sorts of things including teaching children about their emotions.

    We also have books and a poster which we use

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    The do2learn website is brilliant for resources, Iv printed off loads and laminated for longer life.

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    With 4 year olds we made our own emotions book with photos of them showing various emotions. It was good to get them thinking - what would make you happy/sad/angry etc and what would your face look like?

    We also did double sided paper plate faces with one side happy and one side sad. We'd look at the sad side, think about what might make someone sad and what we could do to help them feel better and turn it to the happy side.

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  19. #11
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    Default Emotion resources

    Have a look on pinterest,I remember saving a few ideas. Think it may come under crafts for pre school or 2/3 year olds?

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    Default Emotion resources

    Forgot to say that there are lots and lots of free print offs on pinterest for emotions.

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    Does anyone have mood stars? They look gorgeous and I'm so tempted - but they are pricey and I am spending so much recently.

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    I was tempted too Maza, but decided that they were just something else that we would 'have' to do!

    I've drawn assorted faces on some pebbles, and they live in my loose parts boxes. We talk about them as they are found. I also have a Mr tumble 'feelings' poster from one of the magazines on my cupboard door. The children talk about it. But when it's looking tatty, I'll throw it away.

    I have a little round mirror low on a wall in my downstairs toilet that says 'how do I feel today?' on it. The children use that to check they have a clean face and we do talk about how they feel and make faces into the mirror.

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    I have the stars.... the older ones use them a lot and the babies pull them off the board and try to eat them
    Pixie Dust

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    Oh Pixie that made me laugh!

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  29. #17
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    I have some wooden spoons that I drew faces on. My children call them the emotional spoons! They don't get used that often, but they were cheaper than the stars!

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    I feel like an emotional spoon some days!

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