Books about night/dark/light
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    Default Books about night/dark/light

    I'm about to swap the books in our book area and want it to reflect the darker nights. I will put out our usual classics but wondered if you could recommend any more that I will order from the library.

    So far, I have:
    Owl Babies
    Can't You Sleep Little Bear
    The Owl Who Was Afraid of the Dark

    I'm sure there are loads of obvious ones that I am missing...
    I have been going to our local library by myself these last few weeks as I have no mindees and DD is at school. I have absolutely loved it as children's literature is my passion and I have been able to browse the children's bookshelves by myself without having to look over my shoulder to check that no one is escaping, lol. However, the last couple of times one of the volunteers at the library has made a comment about me not having any children with me and I couldn't work out if he was joking or not. The last time he did it he said it really loudly and everyone turned round to look at me and I hated it! I was too embarrassed and annoyed to ask him if he was serious. I just quickly picked up a book and left. Anyway, I'm too paranoid to hang around in there now and so I want to pre-order the books so that I can just go in and collect them. I must phone them up and ask if they have any rules on adults not accompanied by children, as I know some playgrounds do.

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    I LOVE the owl who was afraid of the dark

    hmmm, there is 'wow said the owl' ... but that is more about an owl being awake in the day and all the colours he sees.

    hello moon? Its never appealed to me, but I'm told its a lovely book.

    we like ZZZZZZ a book of sleep which talks about everyone going to sleep, but not really a book about the dark

    funnybones and spookyrumpus are halloweeny night books as it involves skeletons - but being out at night.

    all the above are picture books and possibly might be too young for your DD.

    we've got this ... glow in the dark book of space http://www.amazon.co.uk/Glow-Dark-Bo...+book+of+space ... absolutely fascinating.

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    Goodnight goodnight is a lovely book

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    Quote Originally Posted by Maza View Post
    I'm about to swap the books in our book area and want it to reflect the darker nights. I will put out our usual classics but wondered if you could recommend any more that I will order from the library.

    So far, I have:
    Owl Babies
    Can't You Sleep Little Bear
    The Owl Who Was Afraid of the Dark

    I'm sure there are loads of obvious ones that I am missing...
    I have been going to our local library by myself these last few weeks as I have no mindees and DD is at school. I have absolutely loved it as children's literature is my passion and I have been able to browse the children's bookshelves by myself without having to look over my shoulder to check that no one is escaping, lol. However, the last couple of times one of the volunteers at the library has made a comment about me not having any children with me and I couldn't work out if he was joking or not. The last time he did it he said it really loudly and everyone turned round to look at me and I hated it! I was too embarrassed and annoyed to ask him if he was serious. I just quickly picked up a book and left. Anyway, I'm too paranoid to hang around in there now and so I want to pre-order the books so that I can just go in and collect them. I must phone them up and ask if they have any rules on adults not accompanied by children, as I know some playgrounds do.
    What about "The Gruffalo's Child"? Or "Shark in the Dark".

    LK

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    Yup, I'd definitely go for Shark in the Dark (and it has to be the glow-in-the-dark edition).

    And for a departure from the usual hackneyed favourites, I'd add Fragoline and the Midnight Dream (Clemency Pearce)


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    Great thanks, some that I have not heard of before. Lollipop Kid, they are good for my DD because I read the more challenging chapter books and non-fiction to her but she will pick up the familiar picture books to read to herself. The Space book looks great, might get that as a birthday present. x

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    Quote Originally Posted by Maza View Post
    I'm about to swap the books in our book area and want it to reflect the darker nights. I will put out our usual classics but wondered if you could recommend any more that I will order from the library.

    So far, I have:
    Owl Babies
    Can't You Sleep Little Bear
    The Owl Who Was Afraid of the Dark

    I'm sure there are loads of obvious ones that I am missing...
    I have been going to our local library by myself these last few weeks as I have no mindees and DD is at school. I have absolutely loved it as children's literature is my passion and I have been able to browse the children's bookshelves by myself without having to look over my shoulder to check that no one is escaping, lol. However, the last couple of times one of the volunteers at the library has made a comment about me not having any children with me and I couldn't work out if he was joking or not. The last time he did it he said it really loudly and everyone turned round to look at me and I hated it! I was too embarrassed and annoyed to ask him if he was serious. I just quickly picked up a book and left. Anyway, I'm too paranoid to hang around in there now and so I want to pre-order the books so that I can just go in and collect them. I must phone them up and ask if they have any rules on adults not accompanied by children, as I know some playgrounds do.
    Maybe it's just me, but I'd be complaining about that comment from a member of staff. I have NEVER been able to properly choose children's books at a library with pre-school children with me. The only way to find good new ones (and there are some unbelievably awful books about) is to go alone. Why shouldn't an adult look at children's books without a child? You could be a parent, grand-parent, aunty or uncle, childminder, nanny, nursery worker, teacher or any other of a number of people who could be key to introducing children to a life-long love of reading. Finding the right book is not an indulgence. Ok, rant over.

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    Quote Originally Posted by sing-low View Post
    Maybe it's just me, but I'd be complaining about that comment from a member of staff. I have NEVER been able to properly choose children's books at a library with pre-school children with me. The only way to find good new ones (and there are some unbelievably awful books about) is to go alone. Why shouldn't an adult look at children's books without a child? You could be a parent, grand-parent, aunty or uncle, childminder, nanny, nursery worker, teacher or any other of a number of people who could be key to introducing children to a life-long love of reading. Finding the right book is not an indulgence. Ok, rant over.
    Thank you! I was beginning to wonder if I was strange going to a children's library by myself, lol! Sometimes I am too sensitive but it really did have a negative impact on me. When libraries are constantly under the threat of closure they should be trying to attract as many customers as possible, not putting them off. I haven't seen any notices up about adults without children but it did make me wonder if it was an unwritten rule.

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    I use our library a lot, both with & without children.

    We have a lovely children's area, but you do need to be constantly supervising the children to make sure they don't escape! I usually position myself near the exit point and let them explore. I do help them choose books and I do chase round after the baby, putting books back on shelves, but I'd never be able to concentrate on selecting specific books. I do that in an evening when I go to change my own books.

    I would definitely have a word with the librarian. Most of ours are really good and will ask if I'm looking for any particular books (they know I'm a childminder). They're always really keen to show me the new books that have come in and will often keep some to one side for me. There is one horrible librarian who is very picky (tuts if the children put the books in the wrong place, moans when we ask for the key to the toilet, double checks exactly how many books we're taking), so we try to avoid her. She's like it with everyone though, so I know it's nothing personal.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Mouse View Post
    I use our library a lot, both with & without children.

    We have a lovely children's area, but you do need to be constantly supervising the children to make sure they don't escape! I usually position myself near the exit point and let them explore. I do help them choose books and I do chase round after the baby, putting books back on shelves, but I'd never be able to concentrate on selecting specific books. I do that in an evening when I go to change my own books.

    I would definitely have a word with the librarian. Most of ours are really good and will ask if I'm looking for any particular books (they know I'm a childminder). They're always really keen to show me the new books that have come in and will often keep some to one side for me. There is one horrible librarian who is very picky (tuts if the children put the books in the wrong place, moans when we ask for the key to the toilet, double checks exactly how many books we're taking), so we try to avoid her. She's like it with everyone though, so I know it's nothing personal.
    Gosh, your horrible librarian must have such high blood pressure - the things you mention are never going to stop in a children's library! We used to have to ask for the key to our library toilets too and it was a right pain. Now they are just open all the time thank goodness - when a two year old's got to go, they've got to go! I sent an email to the library last night asking for clarification on the matter. The automated response said that they will get back to me within three working days. I'll keep you posted.

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    I got a very apologetic response from the library saying that of course we are welcome to visit without children. I hadn't specified who the gentleman was as I didn't want to be nasty but they had found out who it was, so I feel bad now. Not sure what I gained really because I was starting to feel uncomfortable going to the library incase he said something again, but now I will still feel uncomfortable because I think I got him into trouble and I don't want him to feel awkward around me, lol.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Maza View Post
    I got a very apologetic response from the library saying that of course we are welcome to visit without children. I hadn't specified who the gentleman was as I didn't want to be nasty but they had found out who it was, so I feel bad now. Not sure what I gained really because I was starting to feel uncomfortable going to the library incase he said something again, but now I will still feel uncomfortable because I think I got him into trouble and I don't want him to feel awkward around me, lol.
    I'm glad to hear the library are happy for you to visit. I should think that gentleman may be feeling incredibly uncomfortable too! So I would grin and carry on. Xx

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    Quote Originally Posted by Maza View Post
    I got a very apologetic response from the library saying that of course we are welcome to visit without children. I hadn't specified who the gentleman was as I didn't want to be nasty but they had found out who it was, so I feel bad now. Not sure what I gained really because I was starting to feel uncomfortable going to the library incase he said something again, but now I will still feel uncomfortable because I think I got him into trouble and I don't want him to feel awkward around me, lol.
    His behaviour got himself in trouble. Without people like you and me visiting he will be soon out of a job. Go and have a rummage.

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    I find the best way to avoid any awkwardness is not to show any! Go in confidently, speak to him as normal and I bet it'll all be forgotten

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    Quote Originally Posted by Mouse View Post
    I find the best way to avoid any awkwardness is not to show any! Go in confidently, speak to him as normal and I bet it'll all be forgotten
    I should have taken my own advice from your post Mouse - I should have written the email and not pressed 'send' until the next day, lol. Better still, I should have just asked him face to face, as a grown up, if he was serious or not!

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    Quote Originally Posted by Maza View Post
    I should have taken my own advice from your post Mouse - I should have written the email and not pressed 'send' until the next day, lol. Better still, I should have just asked him face to face, as a grown up, if he was serious or not!
    Don't let it ruin your weekend. Take Mouse's advice and walk in early next week with a big smile. He'll propably really appreciate it.

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    Quote Originally Posted by MOH View Post
    Don't let it ruin your weekend. Take Mouse's advice and walk in early next week with a big smile. He'll propably really appreciate it.
    That's true, it's a nice way of looking at it.

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    I wouldn't feel too bad about it: look at it this way.

    You're unlikely to be the only person the library assistant was "off" with. But you may well have been the only person to take it up with a library, it being a very "British" thing for people to moan amongst friends but do absolutely nothing to address a situation. The library is unlikely to discipline the chap or even mark it on his employment record. More likely his boss will have a quiet, private chat and address this as a small 'performance issue', looking for future improvement.

    At worst, your complaint will mean he treats all visitors to the library a lot better from now on.

    At best, he may rediscover why he wanted to work in a library, and find new enjoyment in helping people enjoy books.


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    Quote Originally Posted by Mouse View Post
    I use our library a lot, both with & without children.

    We have a lovely children's area, but you do need to be constantly supervising the children to make sure they don't escape! I usually position myself near the exit point and let them explore. I do help them choose books and I do chase round after the baby, putting books back on shelves, but I'd never be able to concentrate on selecting specific books. I do that in an evening when I go to change my own books.

    I would definitely have a word with the librarian. Most of ours are really good and will ask if I'm looking for any particular books (they know I'm a childminder). They're always really keen to show me the new books that have come in and will often keep some to one side for me. There is one horrible librarian who is very picky (tuts if the children put the books in the wrong place, moans when we ask for the key to the toilet, double checks exactly how many books we're taking), so we try to avoid her. She's like it with everyone though, so I know it's nothing personal.
    It's the other way round in our local library, when I'm browsing through the children's fiction books which are stored in a big wooden train, I often find non fiction books, children's reading books or oversized picture books, so I leave them out on the table so they can be put away in the correct places - I worked there 10 years ago so often get asked "No children today". The big train in our library is great as the children are so busy climbing on the engine that I can browse the books in the carriages without worrying about them escaping.

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    Going back to books there's a small bit about going out into the night in 'The tiger who came to tea'.

    Somebody was selling Usborne books at a toddler group recently. I bought 'Peep inside, Night time'. It has lots of flaps showing night-time animals, bats, glow-worms, people working through the night, night trains etc. It's quite new but you should be able to order it at the library.

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