Medication policy
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  1. #1
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    Question Medication policy

    Hi there, I'm just curious as to what other childminders have in place for their Medication policy. Mainly the non-prescribed medicines, such as paracetamol. We have always been told that any medication including this should be prescribed with the child's name and dosage etc; but we have found out recently that nurseries local to us don't need to? Please help Thanks, Chelsey

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    It was a requirement to ask parents for prescribed medication for about 3 months during 2008 when the Eyfs was first published ...

    They then realised they had made a mistake and doctors didn't need to prescribe - it could be advised by the pharmacist or nurse...

    The Eyfs was quickly updated and all providers were informed via a little guide which has since been withdrawn, presumably because they think everyone is ok with it now!

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    Sarah is right.

    IIRC, Ofsted's "fudge" on over-the-counter meds was to redefine the word "prescribe" to include things for which a prescription is not issued, but are recommended by a qualified nurse, dentist, pharmacist et al.

    Bear in mind that the regulations still require a parent to give consent for a medication, including the specific purpose for which it is to be used. That consent is then considered a 'given' for future treatments with the same medication for the same purpose.

    You may consider this OTT, but here is the safest way I know of ensuring I follow that rule. I tell parents they need to buy over-the-counter meds at a pharmacy (ie. not just grab their Calpol at Wilko's) and insist the pharmacist print one of their labels for the bottle, including the child's name and the reason they are recommending it.

    90%+ of pharmacists will do this, especially when they realise the alternative will be to lose the sale.

    It is a bit of a faff for the parents, but it does mean the CM is well and truly covered.

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    Simona Guest

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    I am sure there are references here to medication that do cover 'prescribed' against what is bought over the co8nter.

    The reason why EYFS 2008 had to cover this requirements was also more far reaching than this and it was in particular due to widespread practice in day nurseries.
    The issue was raised and all medication had to be for the child and either bought or prescribed for that child....that took care of the nurseries practice which had to be addressed.

    I am unsure whether the EYFS 2008 was ever reviewed...there was only one edition which the DfE reviewed in 2012

    Maybe I have misunderstood Sarah but EYFS 2008 was never reviewed...it was clarified so that Ofsted could inspect properly....that was at a time when Ofsted understood their remit not like now.

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    Thankyou all, we were always told by our network co-ordinator that it had to be prescribed but found that parents struggled to get the doctor to prescribe it. It just struck me recently when a child had been able to have paracetamol at nursery, un-prescribed.
    In my mind prescribed or non-prescribed paracetamol isn't the issue, it's the reasoning for it and the dosage! Some guidelines like this need to be clearer for us.

  7. #6
    Simona Guest

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    Quote Originally Posted by littleexp1 View Post
    Thankyou all, we were always told by our network co-ordinator that it had to be prescribed but found that parents struggled to get the doctor to prescribe it. It just struck me recently when a child had been able to have paracetamol at nursery, un-prescribed.
    In my mind prescribed or non-prescribed paracetamol isn't the issue, it's the reasoning for it and the dosage! Some guidelines like this need to be clearer for us.
    some medicines can be bought over the counter ...such as Calpol...which is used by parents as long as their child is not allergic to it.
    Nurofen too can be bought in the chemist but some children may be allergic to Ibuprofen...so we need to know all the details.

    If it is bought over the counter the parents can provide you with a bottle to use with their consent' and then countersign the form at pick up time.
    The bottle should be in the original box and 'labelled' with the child's name and date of birth and only given to that child.

    Is there any particular area you feel it is unclear?
    The EYFS 2014 (page 25) is clear on all medicines....whether prescribed or non-prescription.
    As long as you follow that guidance Ofsted can only judge you are doing the right thing and following correct procedures.

    Not sure what happened at the child's nursery but the very reason we now have a clear guidance is to stop children being given medicine not prescribed to them which nurseries used to do in the past...if it is happening please raise it as it is a No NO.
    Last edited by Simona; 10-11-2015 at 09:28 AM.

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    Quote Originally Posted by littleexp1 View Post
    Thankyou all, we were always told by our network co-ordinator that it had to be prescribed but found that parents struggled to get the doctor to prescribe it. It just struck me recently when a child had been able to have paracetamol at nursery, un-prescribed.
    In my mind prescribed or non-prescribed paracetamol isn't the issue, it's the reasoning for it and the dosage! Some guidelines like this need to be clearer for us.
    Be aware that the dosage on some infant/junior formulae changed within the last couple of years. Not a huge change, so just stick to what is shown on the bottle.

    Also, check the use-by dates on any medications provided by parents. If they have a 'spare' bottle they leave in the changing bag, it's likely to be the one that gets used least often. This is especially the case if the mindee has older siblings: you may be looking at a bottle that's been handed don over several years!

    Finally, remind parents from time to time they must tell you of any medications left in a child's bag, so you can stop it getting into the wrong hands.

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    We have always been thorough with parents consent, medicine forms and dosage. Most parents do bring prescribed paracetamol when their child needs it, i was just thrown by the nursery just filling out a form and being able to adminster it.
    On the EYFS Guidance it says the provider is to implement a policy for administering medication but the medicine must not 'usually' be given unless they have been prescribed for the child by a doctor/dentist/pharmacist.

    I know it's all to cover ourselves, its just not that clear to say its an important subject.
    Thanks for all the advice

  11. #9
    Simona Guest

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    Quote Originally Posted by littleexp1 View Post
    We have always been thorough with parents consent, medicine forms and dosage. Most parents do bring prescribed paracetamol when their child needs it, i was just thrown by the nursery just filling out a form and being able to adminster it.
    On the EYFS Guidance it says the provider is to implement a policy for administering medication but the medicine must not 'usually' be given unless they have been prescribed for the child by a doctor/dentist/pharmacist.

    I know it's all to cover ourselves, its just not that clear to say its an important subject.
    Thanks for all the advice
    You are right...if you look at the paragraph below the one you quote it covers 'non prescribed' medicine to be given with parental permission....so that takes care of the 'usually' mentioned in the paragraph above.
    Sadly the current EYFS is very short on details and badly written in many areas.

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    Sorry -Still not clear to me about labelled medicines- understand if child is antibiotics prescribed by doc it would have all the detail of child and dosage but calpol from chemist wouldn't so are we allowed to give with written permission from parents?
    Thanks in advance x x

 

 

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