Planning advice
Thanks Thanks:  0
Likes Likes:  7
Dislikes Dislikes:  0
Results 1 to 13 of 13

Thread: Planning advice

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Dec 2006
    Location
    Cheshire
    Posts
    37,489
    Registered Childminder since
    1994
    Latest Inspection Grade
    Outstanding
    Post Thanks / Like
    Blog Entries
    21

    Default Planning advice

    The most important planning you write is individual and follows on from...

    • Your observations and assessments of the child’s learning - what the child can do already
    • Comments from parents about what the child does at home
    • Things the child tells you they enjoy doing - their likes, dislikes and interests
    • The characteristics of the child’s learning which help you to recognise how they learn
    • Information in Development Matters about what the child might be doing next - also called ‘next steps’ or ‘PLODS’ (possible lines of development) planning
    • Interests you know children have (usually depending on their age or home influences) which you want to teach them more about eg preparing for school or nursery, minibeasts, finding out about people who help us etc. I will talk more about ‘themed’ planning in a moment
    • Comments from other settings about what the child is doing there - if appropriate.

    Individual planning should be linked to Development Matters and checked regularly to make sure you are supporting children across all 7 areas of learning and development.

    ..................................

    There are 3 different types of learning noted in the EYFS - adult led / adult guided / child initiated - and they all play a different role when you are writing your planning -

    • Adult led - these are the activities you plan for the child, often planned to check their understanding, develop their learning or ensure they are busy, happy and engaged during their time with you.

    • Adult guided - you will often find yourself guiding children’s play. You might step in to give them a new direction for their game, ask them a question to check their understanding of something or be the customer in a café game and give them some new ideas to extend their play.

    • Child initiated - children play freely, choosing toys and games that they want to use. They access the house and garden during their play, depending on what they want to do.

    The EYFS says that your days must be a balance of each type of learning. Think about how you evidence this in your documentation. It doesn’t need to be complicated - some childminders add it to the child’s individual routine.

    ..................................

    It is a requirement of the EYFS 2012 that all parents are provided with their child’s individual routine, including information about -

    • Daily outings
    • Inside and outside play opportunities you offer the child
    • Meal and rest times
    • The child’s activities and experiences through the day
    • Any planned learning you organise through the day eg daily reading or singing sessions.

    The routine is part of your individual planning for the child. You do not need to duplicate the information elsewhere if you already have it written down in the child’s routine.

    A lot of childminders find it useful to link each child’s routine to Development Matters - this helps to show evidence of how you are covering all 7 areas of learning through the day.

    ..................................

    The other popular type of planning for slightly older children (usually from around 3 years ish) is group planning.

    Group planning follows on from individual and routine planning and helps the children learn about new things and gain new experiences.

    The popularity of themes / topics etc waxes and wanes through the years as educational theories come and go - I use themes with the children because I know the benefits and I am ready to argue them with an Ofsted inspector. My inspector liked our themes - but was more interested in how I differentiated / changed them to accommodate individual needs - so this is what you need to show on your planning.

    You write group themed planning by -

    • Noting the children’s individual interests
    • Using Development Matters to guide you, ensuring the activities you are planning are appropriate for each child’s age and stage of development
    • Looking back at your observations and thinking about how each child learns (their learning characteristics)
    • Finding out what children are interested in at home and in other settings.


    The main types of planning include -

    • Long term - you annual plan should be very brief. It will include birthdays and special occasions for all the children and celebrations and festivals you want to cover through the year.

    • Medium term - my medium term planning is in 2 big files -
    - A folder of monthly activities linked to festivals and celebrations
    - A folder of themes / topics in alphabetical order including magazine articles, things I have downloaded from the internet, my own planning from previous years etc.
    This is my planning - you might have yours set out in a different way. Every childminder is unique.

    • Short term - this is mostly individual planning, filed in each child’s individual folder with their observations etc. My play plan records most of the information - I might write extra focussed observations linked to my short term planning as needed.
    You will find a copy of my play plan here - http://www.childmindinghelp.co.uk/fo...-children.html

    • Continuous provision - a lot of childminders find it useful to write continuous provision planning but it is not a requirement.
    You will find more information about it here - Continuous Provision

    • Themed - as we have already discussed, themed planning covers different topics such as -
    - Dinosaurs
    - People who help us
    - Planting and growing
    - The seasons
    - The weather
    - Flowers
    - Pets
    - Caring for the environment
    - Farm animals
    - All about me
    - The circus
    - Bears
    - Wild animals... and many, many more.

    You can use your group planning time and time again once it is written. Just make sure you show how you have changed it for the individual child in their file.

    You must share your planning with parents and involve them where possible... it is very important that they know what their child is doing while with you.

    You need to make sure all your planning is inclusive, appealing to boys and girls equally and including elements of the multicultural and diverse society in which we live.

    ..................................

    Your aim when you are writing your planning is to show that you are helping every child to make good progress in their learning and development journey towards the Early Learning Goals.

    It is up to you how you record this - what forms you use - how hard or easy you make it for yourself.

    There is more information here about how to support children to make good progress in their learning and development -
    Making Good Progress.

  2. Likes cindyn207, childcareclair liked this post
  3. #2
    Join Date
    Feb 2012
    Location
    Carlton Colville, Suffolk
    Posts
    1,211
    Registered Childminder since
    Nov 05
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default

    Thank you Sarah...feel like I say that a lot lol!! You are fab tho

    Sarah x
    Sarah, Bumble Beez x x

  4. #3
    Join Date
    May 2008
    Location
    rushden northants
    Posts
    2
    Registered Childminder since
    april92
    Latest Inspection Grade
    good
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default planning

    I don't do this , I just do next steps , used to do themes but not any more ,am I doing it wrong then ???

  5. #4
    Join Date
    Sep 2012
    Posts
    3,040
    Registered Childminder since
    Oct 12
    Latest Inspection Grade
    GOOD! Hurrah
    Post Thanks / Like
    Blog Entries
    1

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by barbie View Post
    I don't do this , I just do next steps , used to do themes but not any more ,am I doing it wrong then ???
    Do you do any activities related to Christmas, Easter etc etc. Then some of your planning is themed. It's not a requirement, everyone does it differently. I find it useful if I'm struggling to think of something to do. If I notice it is, for example on Thursday, American Independence Day I will plan something relating to that.

  6. #5
    Join Date
    Dec 2006
    Location
    Cheshire
    Posts
    37,489
    Registered Childminder since
    1994
    Latest Inspection Grade
    Outstanding
    Post Thanks / Like
    Blog Entries
    21

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by barbie View Post
    I don't do this , I just do next steps , used to do themes but not any more ,am I doing it wrong then ???
    Read it again Barbie - individual planning = next steps planning. This is the most important planning you can do.

    You must also balance play - adult led and guided / child initiated - that's part of the Eyfs (requirement 1.9) and I am sure you do it already.

    The Eyfs requires us to share children's routines with parents - requirement 3.72 - have a nosy at the parents page of my Knutsford Childminding website I have just put our latest routine on there.

    You might choose to do group planning - but not if you don't want to!!

  7. #6
    Join Date
    Jul 2011
    Location
    Faringdon, United Kingdom
    Posts
    354
    Registered Childminder since
    Jan12
    Latest Inspection Grade
    Good
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default

    Thank you Sarah- only thing I struggle to understand is characteristic of learning- but I have a course next Friday so hopefully will by then

  8. Likes sarah707 liked this post
  9. #7
    Join Date
    Feb 2013
    Posts
    1,211
    Registered Childminder since
    May 13
    Latest Inspection Grade
    Good
    Post Thanks / Like
    Blog Entries
    1

    Default

    Any advice on how to relate this to a baby? I have a six month old mindee (my only one at present) and I'm finding it really hard to relate the planning I do to the EYFS. For example: adult led v. child led play. He has only just learnt to roll over and doesn't move more than that, so he plays with the toys I give him. Is this adult/child led or both? I usually put a choice on the floor for him. Often he just picks up the blanket he's lying on and chews it! Would peekaboo when he does that be adult guided?

    I also feel it's still early days settling him (plus he's been teething) and I get so frustrated feeling like I'm supposed to be doing obs and starting points and faffing with bits of paper when I hardly know him and he hardly knows me. Also, he's only been coming 3 hours twice a week which feels like hardly any time. Current 'planning' if you can call it that is mostly about getting my baby toys out again, working out which toys he likes chewing on and soothe the teeth best, trying him in the donut, using my sling. Am I doing this all wrong or am I just over-thinking things?

  10. Likes sarah707 liked this post
  11. #8
    Join Date
    Jan 2009
    Location
    Surrey
    Posts
    12,122
    Registered Childminder since
    Nov 04
    Latest Inspection Grade
    Good
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default

    Sarah

    Perhaps we should send this to Michael Gove and Mr Wilshaw - remind ofsted and the government what they have been assessing our practice on the last few years - before they want us to teach readign and writing to 2 year olds
    if you do what you've always done, you'll get what you've always got

  12. Likes sarah707 liked this post
  13. #9
    Join Date
    Dec 2006
    Location
    Cheshire
    Posts
    37,489
    Registered Childminder since
    1994
    Latest Inspection Grade
    Outstanding
    Post Thanks / Like
    Blog Entries
    21

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by oxfordshirecm View Post
    Thank you Sarah- only thing I struggle to understand is characteristic of learning- but I have a course next Friday so hopefully will by then
    Did you see this in free resources?

    The Characteristics of Effective Learning

  14. #10
    Join Date
    Mar 2011
    Location
    South London
    Posts
    593
    Registered Childminder since
    mar06
    Latest Inspection Grade
    good
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default

    I would say ur over thinking

    I personally dont and wouldn't write a dead set plan for a under one ( it would be pointless) you go by their age and ability and provide toys books mats etc and encourage and stimulate play for them
    Do a ob on his rolling etc than do simple nx steps like providing toys at a distance to encourage crawling reaching etc

  15. Likes sing-low liked this post
  16. #11
    Join Date
    Dec 2006
    Location
    Cheshire
    Posts
    37,489
    Registered Childminder since
    1994
    Latest Inspection Grade
    Outstanding
    Post Thanks / Like
    Blog Entries
    21

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by sing-low View Post
    Any advice on how to relate this to a baby? I have a six month old mindee (my only one at present) and I'm finding it really hard to relate the planning I do to the EYFS. For example: adult led v. child led play. He has only just learnt to roll over and doesn't move more than that, so he plays with the toys I give him. Is this adult/child led or both? I usually put a choice on the floor for him. Often he just picks up the blanket he's lying on and chews it! Would peekaboo when he does that be adult guided?

    I also feel it's still early days settling him (plus he's been teething) and I get so frustrated feeling like I'm supposed to be doing obs and starting points and faffing with bits of paper when I hardly know him and he hardly knows me. Also, he's only been coming 3 hours twice a week which feels like hardly any time. Current 'planning' if you can call it that is mostly about getting my baby toys out again, working out which toys he likes chewing on and soothe the teeth best, trying him in the donut, using my sling. Am I doing this all wrong or am I just over-thinking things?
    You are over-thinking it!!

    You plan his day - you manage his routine - you play with him = adult led.

    You pass him toys - you answer when he talks to you - you encourage him to do things if he seems interested = adult guided.

    You let him play with his baby basket - you pop him under an arch = child initiated.

    You plan individually for him because you are aware of the next steps he needs to take in his learning and development and you are supporting him to achieve them.


  17. Likes sing-low liked this post
  18. #12
    Join Date
    Mar 2011
    Location
    South London
    Posts
    593
    Registered Childminder since
    mar06
    Latest Inspection Grade
    good
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by sarah707 View Post

    You are over-thinking it!!

    You plan his day - you manage his routine - you play with him = adult led.

    You pass him toys - you answer when he talks to you - you encourage him to do things if he seems interested = adult guided.

    You let him play with his baby basket - you pop him under an arch = child initiated.

    You plan individually for him because you are aware of the next steps he needs to take in his learning and development and you are supporting him to achieve them.



    Sarah put it so much better than me haha

  19. #13
    Join Date
    Jul 2011
    Location
    Faringdon, United Kingdom
    Posts
    354
    Registered Childminder since
    Jan12
    Latest Inspection Grade
    Good
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by sarah707 View Post

    Did you see this in free resources?

    The Characteristics of Effective Learning
    Yes I did thank you- just struggling to put it into context so hoping the two course will help

 

 

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  

Quick Links and Advertisements

Important Information Links
Some Useful Quick Links
Advertisements

 

You can also find us on:
Planning advice Planning advice Planning advice

We use cookies to make this site as useful as possible. They are small text files placed in your browser to track usage of our site but they don’t tell us who you are.
By continuing to use this site you are consenting to cookies being placed on your computer. Find out more here: Cookies in Use

Childminding Help and the Childminding Forum are part of Childcare.co.uk