'Coronavirus Contingency Planning'
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  1. #41
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    Quote Originally Posted by mumofone View Post
    Anyone know of any childminders or nurseries that are shutting their doors due to Coronavirus?
    I know a few childminders have closed their doors but they either have health issues or family members who do. So a sensible decision.

    Other than those few cases it seems to be business as normal
    When someone tells you nothing is impossible, tell them to go slam a revolving door

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  3. #42
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    Latest from Ofsted

    I know that the spread of COVID-19 is worrying and poses challenges to you as childminders. We completely understand that you will be thinking about how you can continue to offer childcare for your children and their families, while planning how to deal with problems caused by the virus. To help answer some of your questions, please take a look at the government’s latest guidance for educational/childcare settings: COVID-19: guidance for education settings - GOV.UK

    Can I provide childcare for extra children? This is one question you have been asking and the EYFS already allows for this. Childminders can make exceptions to the usual ratios – i.e. care for more children under five years for example. What the EYFS doesn’t allow you to do is care for more than a total of six children aged under eight -see parts 3.30 and 3.42 here: Early years foundation stage statutory framework (EYFS) - GOV.UK.

    At Ofsted, we continue to follow government guidelines – but what does this mean in practice? Are we continuing to inspect?

    We are required to continue with our inspection and regulatory activity. However, this means that if an inspector calls to say your inspection is due, the first thing they will do is find out how you are dealing with any problems caused by the virus and take this into consideration. I hope you will have seen that we have updated our guidance on deferring an inspection: Deferring Ofsted inspections - GOV.UK

    We’re monitoring the current situation closely and are in daily contact with the Department for Education. Keep looking at this page because we will let you know of any updates.

    We know that childcare is of course a key issue for the country and I thank you for continuing to play your part.

    Gill Jones, Deputy Director, Early Education, Ofsted.
    When someone tells you nothing is impossible, tell them to go slam a revolving door

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    As expected, all except one parent has been OK with my policy. I knew she'd be the only one to disagree. She think it's all a 'big fuss over nothing'.

    This is the parent who always pushes the rules when her son is ill, thinks he is a little angel (everyone else is to blame for his behaviour) and finds it very inconvenient when I take any time off (despite me giving plenty of notice). I really won't be sorry if she decides this is all too much for her and leaves

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  7. #44
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    Quote Originally Posted by Mouse View Post
    As expected, all except one parent has been OK with my policy. I knew she'd be the only one to disagree. She think it's all a 'big fuss over nothing'.

    This is the parent who always pushes the rules when her son is ill, thinks he is a little angel (everyone else is to blame for his behaviour) and finds it very inconvenient when I take any time off (despite me giving plenty of notice). I really won't be sorry if she decides this is all too much for her and leaves
    What's your policy Mouse? What does she not like? She sounds like hard work!

  8. #45
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    Quote Originally Posted by FussyElmo View Post
    Personally i think the insurance companies will find any excuse not to pay out as it may cost millions unless the government help.

    I see so many people switch their insurance policies or take on income protection which more than likely be a sub clause saying you are not covered for so many months of the cover starting or for known outbreaks etc.
    I need to renew my insurance any day. I doubt any of the insurers are adding new clauses to their policies to cover this though.

  9. #46
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    Quote Originally Posted by FussyElmo View Post
    Latest from Ofsted

    I know that the spread of COVID-19 is worrying and poses challenges to you as childminders. We completely understand that you will be thinking about how you can continue to offer childcare for your children and their families, while planning how to deal with problems caused by the virus. To help answer some of your questions, please take a look at the government’s latest guidance for educational/childcare settings: COVID-19: guidance for education settings - GOV.UK

    Can I provide childcare for extra children? This is one question you have been asking and the EYFS already allows for this. Childminders can make exceptions to the usual ratios – i.e. care for more children under five years for example. What the EYFS doesn’t allow you to do is care for more than a total of six children aged under eight -see parts 3.30 and 3.42 here: Early years foundation stage statutory framework (EYFS) - GOV.UK.

    At Ofsted, we continue to follow government guidelines – but what does this mean in practice? Are we continuing to inspect?

    We are required to continue with our inspection and regulatory activity. However, this means that if an inspector calls to say your inspection is due, the first thing they will do is find out how you are dealing with any problems caused by the virus and take this into consideration. I hope you will have seen that we have updated our guidance on deferring an inspection: Deferring Ofsted inspections - GOV.UK

    We’re monitoring the current situation closely and are in daily contact with the Department for Education. Keep looking at this page because we will let you know of any updates.

    We know that childcare is of course a key issue for the country and I thank you for continuing to play your part.

    Gill Jones, Deputy Director, Early Education, Ofsted.

    Ah, thank you for this :-)

  10. #47
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    Quote Originally Posted by mumofone View Post
    What's your policy Mouse? What does she not like? She sounds like hard work!
    My policy basically says that I'll exclude any child who has a new, continuous cough or a temperature above 37.5. I won't accept a child who has been give paracetamol or who needs it through the day to control their temperature. I've also said that exclusions are non-negotiable. I won't accept teething as a reason for a fever!
    I've also said my fees policy still applies so if I exclude a child, full fees are due.

    This mum is saying all children gets coughs and colds and it's only adults who need to be concerned if they have symptoms. She is a parent who doses her child up with Calpol, knowing they should really be at home and who puts all illnesses down to teething. She's also the only one who ever questions having to pay when her child is off ill, despite it being in the contract.

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  12. #48
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    Quote Originally Posted by Mouse View Post
    My policy basically says that I'll exclude any child who has a new, continuous cough or a temperature above 37.5. I won't accept a child who has been give paracetamol or who needs it through the day to control their temperature. I've also said that exclusions are non-negotiable. I won't accept teething as a reason for a fever!
    I've also said my fees policy still applies so if I exclude a child, full fees are due.

    This mum is saying all children gets coughs and colds and it's only adults who need to be concerned if they have symptoms. She is a parent who doses her child up with Calpol, knowing they should really be at home and who puts all illnesses down to teething. She's also the only one who ever questions having to pay when her child is off ill, despite it being in the contract.
    Theres always one!!!!

  13. #49
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    14 days self isolation now and for the whole household
    When someone tells you nothing is impossible, tell them to go slam a revolving door

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    Think there is always a parent like that mouse

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    has anyone updated their 'policy' from last friday ????

    x

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    Quote Originally Posted by loocyloo View Post
    has anyone updated their 'policy' from last friday ????

    x
    Last Thursday my policy was that I wouldn't exclude children who had a cough or temperature. I changed that on Friday to I would exclude children for a cough or temperature, but wouldn't exclude if a family member was in self-isolation. That's now been changed to excluding for 14 days if anyone in the household is self-isolating.

    I'm thinking of setting up a WhatsApp group to share information rather than keep having to send out new letters or emails.

    I am also thinking of changing my fees policy. At the moment it's full fee if a child is away and no fee if I am closed. As we all know though, many parents will send their children, no matter what, if they're having to pay full fee. I've a feeling not all parents will tell me they're self-isolating, just so they can keep sending their children if they're having to pay for the space anyway. If the schools close I have 2 families who have older siblings who will be at home. Both sets of parents will be working from home or not working, but I know they'll still send the younger ones.

    I'm thinking of changing it to half fees if they keep their child off and half fees if I close, up to a maximum of 4 weeks. I'm hoping it might encourage more parents to keep their children at home if that's really where they should be. It will also mean I have some money coming in if I have to close.

    What are your thoughts? Can you see any major flaws in the plan? I would make it an optional change, so parents would only sign up to it if they wanted to.

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    I can't see a flaw, but I have some parents who would want the half fees if don't attend and usual no fees if I'm closed.
    However, I'm pretty sure all would tell me if self isolating.

    I'm due to send out next month's invoices in a couple of days ... an wondering if moving to weekly invoices is a plan? (Except for those who pay by voucher company/etc) as their payments take long enough!

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    Quote Originally Posted by loocyloo View Post
    I can't see a flaw, but I have some parents who would want the half fees if don't attend and usual no fees if I'm closed.
    However, I'm pretty sure all would tell me if self isolating.

    I'm due to send out next month's invoices in a couple of days ... an wondering if moving to weekly invoices is a plan? (Except for those who pay by voucher company/etc) as their payments take long enough!
    I think that's the key to it - know your parents!

    I will get them to sign to say they agree to half fees if I close. I will still be invoicing full fees monthly in advance for April, but will refund or knock it off the May bill if I need to. I'd rather have the money upfront and refund, than trying to get money out of them if they're reluctant to pay!

    I'm also thinking that if some of the children are kept at home I could offer spaces to other parents who may need short term care if their childminder or nursery is closed. I'm thinking specifically NHS staff etc. where they have to keep working.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Mouse View Post
    I think that's the key to it - know your parents!

    I will get them to sign to say they agree to half fees if I close. I will still be invoicing full fees monthly in advance for April, but will refund or knock it off the May bill if I need to. I'd rather have the money upfront and refund, than trying to get money out of them if they're reluctant to pay!

    I'm also thinking that if some of the children are kept at home I could offer spaces to other parents who may need short term care if their childminder or nursery is closed. I'm thinking specifically NHS staff etc. where they have to keep working.
    I too would rather have money upfront! Think I'll follow your lead and carry on with monthly fees!

    Good plan to offer care to specific workers if you have space. X

  21. #56
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    Quote Originally Posted by loocyloo View Post
    I can't see a flaw, but I have some parents who would want the half fees if don't attend and usual no fees if I'm closed.
    However, I'm pretty sure all would tell me if self isolating.

    I'm due to send out next month's invoices in a couple of days ... an wondering if moving to weekly invoices is a plan? (Except for those who pay by voucher company/etc) as their payments take long enough!
    Yes Ive been wondering about weekly invoices through this time.

    Would also help me budget better!

    I have zero £ in the bank :-(

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    random question ....

    'high temperature' ... is that one that comes and goes fleetingly, or one that hangs around for a few hours/days? I know all the blurb says 'high temp' ... but how long do they have to have it before it is considered a high temp? I know they are saying a persistent cough and high temp ( is that a persistent high temp ) ??? I've looked, but i can't find out the answer!

    Only because I was chatting to a friend earlier, and her child is prone to febrile convulsions ... from nowhere he can get a high temp, that then causes convulsion, and then it's gone. He may have been brewing the temp for an hour or 2, but not shown any signs of distress, so its only if she touches him that she realises he is hot. ( before the convulsion )

  23. #58
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    Quote Originally Posted by loocyloo View Post
    random question ....

    'high temperature' ... is that one that comes and goes fleetingly, or one that hangs around for a few hours/days? I know all the blurb says 'high temp' ... but how long do they have to have it before it is considered a high temp? I know they are saying a persistent cough and high temp ( is that a persistent high temp ) ??? I've looked, but i can't find out the answer!

    Only because I was chatting to a friend earlier, and her child is prone to febrile convulsions ... from nowhere he can get a high temp, that then causes convulsion, and then it's gone. He may have been brewing the temp for an hour or 2, but not shown any signs of distress, so its only if she touches him that she realises he is hot. ( before the convulsion )
    Who knows there isnt really guidance out there to explain just any new temperature should mean self isolation
    When someone tells you nothing is impossible, tell them to go slam a revolving door

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    Quote Originally Posted by FussyElmo View Post
    Who knows there isnt really guidance out there to explain just any new temperature should mean self isolation
    i'm taking it mean one that hangs around a while; so that you notice child is ill.

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    Me again!

    I keep seeing posts on (DHs) Facebook that Covid19 starts with a sore throat .. 3-4 days, then a cough/ pneumonia followed by high temp ....

    Which doesn't sound like the ' self isolate if high temp or persistent cough ' ... if initial bit I put above is true ... then a sore throat is first sign! Confused and worried. ( not that I have a sore throat, but I keep seeing that post all over! )

 

 
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