Ideas for a positioning schema
Thanks Thanks:  0
Likes Likes:  11
Dislikes Dislikes:  0
Results 1 to 17 of 17
  1. #1
    Join Date
    Feb 2009
    Location
    By the sea
    Posts
    8,964
    Latest Inspection Grade
    Outstanding
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default Ideas for a positioning schema

    I have a lo who is demonstrating a real positioning schema.

    He starts with the box of cars and sets them all out on the floor, then gets the treasure basket and does the same, then the small world box, duplo box etc. He has them beautifully set out and I don't want to move them, but we quickly run out of floor space. I'm having to get him to pack each box away before he gets the next one out. I take photos of his handy work, so he can still see them, but it's not the same as letting him fill the floor with everything.

    I don't know if it would work, but I'm looking for ideas for things he can set out on trays. My thinking is that he can still do his positioning, but on a smaller scale. I'll give him individual trays with small boxes of things.

    So far I've thought of normal Lego (so a smaller version of duplo), the counting/sorting bears and buttons. I'm hoping you lot can give me ideas of other small and interesting things

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Dec 2010
    Location
    My happy place
    Posts
    663
    Registered Childminder since
    Oct 08
    Latest Inspection Grade
    Good
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Mouse View Post
    I have a lo who is demonstrating a real positioning schema.

    He starts with the box of cars and sets them all out on the floor, then gets the treasure basket and does the same, then the small world box, duplo box etc. He has them beautifully set out and I don't want to move them, but we quickly run out of floor space. I'm having to get him to pack each box away before he gets the next one out. I take photos of his handy work, so he can still see them, but it's not the same as letting him fill the floor with everything.

    I don't know if it would work, but I'm looking for ideas for things he can set out on trays. My thinking is that he can still do his positioning, but on a smaller scale. I'll give him individual trays with small boxes of things.

    So far I've thought of normal Lego (so a smaller version of duplo), the counting/sorting bears and buttons. I'm hoping you lot can give me ideas of other small and interesting things
    I had one like that a while ago. I bought a couple of really nice floor puzzles - 1-10 was a big hit (in a line), as was an Orchard Toys road map one, which he could then drive the cars on.

    Hope it helps,

    L

  3. Likes Mouse liked this post
  4. #3
    Simona Guest

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Mouse View Post
    I have a lo who is demonstrating a real positioning schema.

    He starts with the box of cars and sets them all out on the floor, then gets the treasure basket and does the same, then the small world box, duplo box etc. He has them beautifully set out and I don't want to move them, but we quickly run out of floor space. I'm having to get him to pack each box away before he gets the next one out. I take photos of his handy work, so he can still see them, but it's not the same as letting him fill the floor with everything.

    I don't know if it would work, but I'm looking for ideas for things he can set out on trays. My thinking is that he can still do his positioning, but on a smaller scale. I'll give him individual trays with small boxes of things.

    So far I've thought of normal Lego (so a smaller version of duplo), the counting/sorting bears and buttons. I'm hoping you lot can give me ideas of other small and interesting things
    I have used stones, shells, pine cones, largish wooden beads and tiles samples...the little ones used for borders.
    In garden centres you can find bags of colourful stones too....which means the child can sort and match too

  5. Likes Mouse liked this post
  6. #4
    Join Date
    Jun 2011
    Posts
    867
    Registered Childminder since
    June86
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default

    Different shapes, colours and sizes of pasta, stacking beakers the sort babies use or plastic boxes that he can stack, clothes pegs, spoons.

  7. Likes Mouse liked this post
  8. #5
    Join Date
    Oct 2008
    Posts
    7,847
    Registered Childminder since
    oct 02
    Latest Inspection Grade
    outstanding
    Post Thanks / Like
    Blog Entries
    8

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Simona View Post

    I have used stones, shells, pine cones, largish wooden beads and tiles samples...the little ones used for borders.
    In garden centres you can find bags of colourful stones too....which means the child can sort and match too
    Just what I was going to suggest.
    We also use glass pebbles, corks, lollysticks, pumpkin seeds, acrylic gems, buttons, pompoms ...

  9. Likes Mouse liked this post
  10. #6
    Join Date
    Aug 2007
    Posts
    31,017
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default

    Lolly sticks are popular here, also milk bottle tops.

    What about a clothes line and pegs so he can hang things in a line? I once had a minded who loved to organise the dressing up rail - making sure all the clothes hangers faced the same direction etc.

    If floor space inside soon gets filled what about finding natural things outside - sticks, stones, pine cones, acorns, chestnuts (when in season), leaves, flowers etc.

    Miffy xx
    Keep smiling!

  11. Likes Mouse liked this post
  12. #7
    Simona Guest

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by loocyloo View Post
    Just what I was going to suggest.
    We also use glass pebbles, corks, lollysticks, pumpkin seeds, acrylic gems, buttons, pompoms ...
    All great ideas ...the only thing I have observed in the past is that children who use positioning schemas tend to want a 'lot of space' and usually use bigger size resources and cover big areas.

    One child used to line up all the cars and trucks and then we were stuck one one side of the room as he did not like us 'crossing' his line !!...and he insisted I leave his creation in place until the next day!

  13. Likes Mouse liked this post
  14. #8
    Join Date
    Feb 2009
    Location
    By the sea
    Posts
    8,964
    Latest Inspection Grade
    Outstanding
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default

    Thank you. Some great ideas there.

    I'm happy for him to use a big space some of the time - I let him use the hallway so he's got a long run & no one to disturb him - but I would like to see if we can contain it a bit by using smaller space & objects.

    I had him here by himself for an hour yesterday and he set out all the cars, all the Happyland people, everything from the treasure basket, the whole box of K'Nex and the wooden blocks. When I went to tidy up the craft table I realised all the crayons were neatly set out as well!

    Now I'm starting to wonder when a schema becomes an obsession and a bit of an issue? Any thoughts on that?

  15. #9
    Join Date
    Jun 2011
    Posts
    867
    Registered Childminder since
    June86
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default

    I don't think it does become an obsession are you thinking OCD or autistic tendencies l think you would notice a difference, as in doing nothing but one thing, l personally think schemas are a more effective way of knowing how a child likes to learn and play than the COEL, by looking at a child’s repeated interests you can plan experiences that they will really enjoy and extend their thinking as well as potentially eliminating some patterns appearing in unwanted situations (OCD) . if you do collage or craft with your little one does he like to pile the things up on the paper rather than randomly stick all over the paper as most children do what is he like with his food does he not like it if food touches or his mixed up. This is one schema that we all keep/have tendencies of throughout life if you think l bet there are things that you have to have just so but your not OCD just tidy minded .
    Last edited by QualityCare; 23-06-2015 at 08:17 AM.

  16. #10
    Simona Guest

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Mouse View Post
    Thank you. Some great ideas there.

    I'm happy for him to use a big space some of the time - I let him use the hallway so he's got a long run & no one to disturb him - but I would like to see if we can contain it a bit by using smaller space & objects.

    I had him here by himself for an hour yesterday and he set out all the cars, all the Happyland people, everything from the treasure basket, the whole box of K'Nex and the wooden blocks. When I went to tidy up the craft table I realised all the crayons were neatly set out as well!

    Now I'm starting to wonder when a schema becomes an obsession and a bit of an issue? Any thoughts on that?
    Please don't look at it as an obsession but a very clear trait of the CoEL.
    I have had children in my care in the past who are now in their teens and beyond and I can see how their schemas and CoEL have come out in their character and disposition, resilience and determination.

    Do keep your eyes open...of course... when observing your child and I hope you will see the incredible potential children show in schemas.

    Keep us posted!!

  17. #11
    Join Date
    Feb 2009
    Location
    By the sea
    Posts
    8,964
    Latest Inspection Grade
    Outstanding
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by QualityCare View Post
    This is one schema that we all keep/have tendencies of throughout life if you think l bet there are things that you have to have just so but your not OCD just tidy minded .
    I have definitely kept a lot of my positioning schema tendencies and I'm forever having to tell my family I don't have OCD, I just like things to look nice

    This lo's schema alone is not an issue. It does indeed show me how his mind works and I know he uses it as a comforting activity - if he is feeling a bit on edge, or unsure, he will set things out, so it's something I am quite happy to let him do. My slight concerns come from experience of another child I looked after a few years ago. We (me and parents) encouraged his interest, but it did become a huge obsession and he was eventually diagnosed with autism, although that took a long time and there were other pointers as well as the obsession. I've always thought I should have highlighted my concerns sooner with him and that probably makes me over cautious now.

  18. #12
    Join Date
    Jun 2011
    Posts
    867
    Registered Childminder since
    June86
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default

    that will make you over cautious but as your child is happy with any toys/equipment he can position it sounds 'normal' in my experience a child with autistic tendencies wants to position the same things in the same order all of the time e.g. if the books in the bookcase were in a different place they would put them in exactly the same order each time, if you had 3 ornaments on the side and changed the position they would have to put them back, they wouldn't be happy if only some of the cars they positioned were put out, l had a child who was diagnosed as autistic and would check my cupboard where the plastic coloured plates were if l had stacked them out of sequence he would change them nothing else in the cupboard just the plates.

  19. Likes Mouse liked this post
  20. #13
    Join Date
    Feb 2009
    Location
    By the sea
    Posts
    8,964
    Latest Inspection Grade
    Outstanding
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default

    Thank you QC. Yes, I can see a difference with this child and the previous one.

    This lo sets things out, but in no particular order. And he doesn't get upset when someone takes a piece, or moves a piece. His lay outs seem quite random, whereas the other child was very precise.

    I do see a lot of similarities in their overall behaviour, but think maybe I should concentrate just as much on the differences which will no doubt show my current mindee isn't so much like the previous one as I'm imagining

  21. #14
    Join Date
    Sep 2012
    Posts
    3,040
    Registered Childminder since
    Oct 12
    Latest Inspection Grade
    GOOD! Hurrah
    Post Thanks / Like
    Blog Entries
    1

    Default

    I found this the other day about schemas in general which I thought was useful

    http://www.sennenpreschool.org.uk/up...hema2_copy.pdf

  22. Likes Mouse, QualityCare liked this post
  23. #15
    Join Date
    Feb 2009
    Location
    By the sea
    Posts
    8,964
    Latest Inspection Grade
    Outstanding
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default

    Thanks Rick. I like that.

    I've been talking about schemas with one of my mums and that will be good to pass on to her as well

  24. Likes Rick liked this post
  25. #16
    Join Date
    May 2011
    Posts
    3,282
    Registered Childminder since
    Mar 10
    Latest Inspection Grade
    Outstanding
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default

    I like the tray idea. How about giving him a table cloth/towel/small blanket etc on the floor to fill if he needs a bigger area? Or a rolled out piece of playdough that he can place his 'things' on - then he will be learning about textures, pressure and mark making. I got some neon plastic shot glasses (amazon I think) and all my little ones love putting these in lines/circles etc. If the sun is shining they make lovely coloured reflections/shadows (?) on the carpet too.

  26. #17
    Join Date
    Feb 2009
    Location
    By the sea
    Posts
    8,964
    Latest Inspection Grade
    Outstanding
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Maza View Post
    . I got some neon plastic shot glasses (amazon I think) and all my little ones love putting these in lines/circles etc. If the sun is shining they make lovely coloured reflections/shadows (?) on the carpet too.
    Oh, I've got some of those in the cupboard - unopened! I bought them ages ago, probably from Amazon when someone on here posted about them, but I've never used them. I'll dig them out for next week

  27. Likes Maza liked this post
 

 

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  

Quick Links and Advertisements

Important Information Links
Some Useful Quick Links
Advertisements

 

You can also find us on:
Ideas for a positioning schema Ideas for a positioning schema Ideas for a positioning schema

We use cookies to make this site as useful as possible. They are small text files placed in your browser to track usage of our site but they don’t tell us who you are.
By continuing to use this site you are consenting to cookies being placed on your computer. Find out more here: Cookies in Use

Childminding Help and the Childminding Forum are part of Childcare.co.uk